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Ebola kills 31 people in DR Congo: WHO

Health care workers, wearing protective suits, work at the Elwa hospital in Monrovia on August 30, 2014 An outbreak of the Ebola virus in the Democratic Republic of Congo has killed 31 people and the epidemic remains contained in a remote northwestern region, UN the World Health Organization (WHO) said Tuesday. "There are now 31 deaths," Eugene Kambambi, the WHO's head of communication in DR Congo, told AFP, citing Congolese authorities and stressing that the epidemic "remains contained" in an area around 800 kilometres (500 miles) north of the capital Kinshasa. Health officials had previously given a death toll of 13 people from the lethal haemorrhagic fever since August 11 around the isolated town of Boende, surrounded by dense tropical forest in Equateur province. Kabambi was speaking by telephone from Mbandaka, the provincial capital, where he was accompanied by Health Minister Felix Kabange Numbi and the WHO representative in DRC, Joseph Cabore.


Ebola threatens food security in West Africa: FAO

Resident of West Point neighbourhood, which has been quarantined following an outbreak of Ebola, receives food rations from the United Nations World Food Programme in Monrovia The world's worst Ebola epidemic has put harvests at risk and sent food prices soaring in West Africa, the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) said on Tuesday, warning the problem would intensify in coming months. The FAO issued a special alert for Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea, the three countries most affected by the outbreak, which has killed around 1,550 people since the virus was detected in the remote jungles of southeastern Guinea in March. Restrictions on people's movements and the establishment of quarantine zones to contain the spread of the hemorrhagic fever has led to panic buying, food shortages and price hikes in countries ill-prepared to absorb the shock. "Even prior to the Ebola outbreak, households in some of the most affected areas were spending up to 80 percent of their incomes on food," said Vincent Martin, head of an FAO unit in Dakar which is coordinating the agency's response.


How does a police department lose a Humvee?

A police tactical team moves in to disperse a group of protesters on Wednesday, Aug. 13, 2014, in Ferguson, Mo. The protests were sparked after Michael Brown, an unarmed black man, was shot and killed by Darren Wilson, a white Ferguson police officer, on Aug. 9, 2014. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson) Among the issues that Obama is likely to find is that the program lacks oversight and accountability. Once Pentagon weapons reach the 8,000 police departments that participate in the program, many of them in tiny towns, the federal government has little control over them. The departments are not allowed to sell or dispose of any of the 1033 program's “controlled” items, which include small arms and tactical vehicles. An agency in each state takes over responsibility for checking the inventory once a year and reporting anything missing to the Defense Department’s Defense Logistics Agency.


Russia and NATO go head to head

Russian President Vladimir Putin Russia vowed on Tuesday to adopt a beefed-up military doctrine over NATO's plans to establish a rapid-response team that could ward off the Kremlin's expansion into Ukraine and feared push further west. Moscow's surprise announcement added a new and threatening new layer of tensions ahead of NATO's two-day summit that starts Thursday in Wales and will see Ukraine's beleaguered leader Petro Poroshenko personally lobby US President Barack Obama for military help.


U.S. military attacks Islamists in Somalia

FILE - In this Dec. 8, 2008 file photo, armed al-shabab fighters on pickup trucks prepare to travel into the city, just outside Mogadishu, in Somalia. U.S. military forces targeted the Islamic extremist al-Shabab network in an operation Monday, Sept. 1, 2014 in Somalia, the Pentagon said. (AP Photo/Farah Abdi Warsameh, File) A Somali official says the strike targeted the Islamic extremist network's fugitive leader.


Defeat of California initiative would protect insurers' profits

Proposition 45 would allow California's insurance chief to block insurance rate hikes; insurers are spending millions to kill it.

Dengue fever strikes models in Japan

A worker sprays insecticide at the Yoyogi park, central Tokyo, believed to be the source of the mosquito-borne dengue fever, on August 28, 2014 A worsening outbreak of dengue fever in Japan has claimed its first celebrities -- two young models sent on assignment to the Tokyo park believed to be its source. The details emerged as the government said Tuesday that at least 34 people have now caught the disease, which has not been seen in Japan for seven decades apart from cases contracted overseas. The two women -- Saaya, 20, and Eri Aoki, 25 -- were sent to Yoyogi Park last month for the Saturday variety show on which they appear, the Nikkan Sports said. The revelation that the two beauties had succumbed to the mosquito-borne disease provided fodder for the self-referencing TV shows that fill daytime schedules in celebrity-obsessed Japan.


Novo Nordisk drops inflammatory disorder business, incurs cost

Insulin jabs are pictured on a production line in Novo Nordisk's plant in Kalundborg Danish pharmaceutical company Novo Nordisk said on Tuesday it has decided to stop its activities within inflammatory disorders and only focus on the treatment and prevention of diabetes and obesity. The decision follows a discontinuation for the company's most advanced drug candidate within the area, a drug used to treat rheumatoid arthritis and known as anti-IL-20, announced on Aug. 7 together with its with second quarter results. "The discontinuation of anti-IL-20 delays our earliest possible entrance into the market for anti-inflammatory therapeutics to the late 2020s," Chief Science Officer Mads Krogsgaard Thomsen said in a statement. Novo Nordisk said 400 employees would be affected by the decision but that it hoped to offer other positions within the company to more than half of those.


South Korea lifts ban on beef with feed additive: food ministry

By Meeyoung Cho SEOUL (Reuters) - South Korea has lifted a ban on the use of animal feed additive zilpaterol in beef, opening the door to imports containing the growth enhancer as well as domestic sales of the product. Seoul said last October that it intended to ease its zero-tolerance policy on zilpaterol-based drugs, such as Merck & Co Inc's Zilmax, after a risk assessment found it could be permitted at certain levels. South Korea last year suspended some U.S. An official at South Korea's food ministry confirmed on Tuesday that imports of beef muscle with 1 part per billion (ppb) of zilpaterol, 5 ppb in beef liver and 10 ppb in beef kidney had been approved as of late last month.

Nigeria records another Ebola case in oil city, 17 cases total

Nigeria has a third confirmed case of Ebola in the oil hub of Port Harcourt, bringing the country's total confirmed infections to 17, with 271 people under surveillance, the health minister said on Monday. A doctor in Port Harcourt died last week after treating someone who came in contact of the Liberian-American man who was the first recorded case of the virus in Africa's most populous country. Patrick Sawyer, the first case, came from Liberia, and then collapsed at Lagos airport on July 20. The shift to Port Harcourt shows how easily containment efforts can be undermined.

Poor response to Ebola causing needless deaths: World Bank head

World Bank President Jim Yong Kim addresses the U.S.-Africa Business Forum in Washington By Daniel Flynn and Tim Cocks DAKAR/LAGOS (Reuters) - The world's "disastrously inadequate response" to West Africa's Ebola outbreak means many people are dying needlessly, the head of the World Bank said on Monday, as Nigeria confirmed another case of the virus. In a newspaper editorial, World Bank President Jim Yong Kim said Western healthcare facilities would easily be able to contain the disease, and urged wealthy nations to share the knowledge and resources to help African countries tackle it. "Many are dying needlessly," read the editorial, co-written by Harvard University professor Paul Farmer, with whom Kim founded Partners In Health, a charity that works for better healthcare in poorer countries. In a vivid sign of the danger posed by inadequate health provision, a man escaped from an Ebola quarantine centre in Monrovia on Monday and sent people fleeing in fear as he walked through a market in search of food, a Reuters witness said.


Doubts over whether Detroit bankruptcy plan gets job done

By David Greising, Karen Pierog and Tim Reid DETROIT Reuters) - Detroit’s plan to recover from bankruptcy includes several blueprints for a new future. Detroit is far short of the $1.7 billion it needs over the next 10 years to remove abandoned buildings, replace outdated technology and increase public safety to stem the exodus from the city. “What Detroit needed to start with was a reinvestment program,” said James Spiotto, managing director of Chapman Strategic Advisors, a municipal finance consultancy. “If you don’t solve the systemic problem and fix it for real, all you’re going to do is repeat it going forward.” Detroit’s 1,034-page plan for fixing the city’s finances will be the subject of a weeks-long bankruptcy court proceeding, beginning on Tuesday.

Fast-food workers to launch intensified protests across U.S.

Demonstrators chant in the driveway during a protest at the McDonald's headquarters in Oak Brook The protests, announced on Twitter by organizer Fight For 15, come as cities across the nation propose minimum wage increases while Democrats seek to raise the federal minimum wage ahead of this year's mid-term congressional elections. Fast food workers have launched a series of protests over the last nearly two years to bring awareness to their demands, which include the right to unionize without retaliation. In one of the last major actions, restaurant workers launched rallies in 150 cities, including Boston, Chicago, New York and Miami in May. This time, organizers are staging walkouts in more than 100 cities and plan to use nonviolent civil disobedience tactics such as sit-ins, The New York Times reported.


Hong Kong police arrest 19 in pro-democracy scuffles

A pro-democracy activist is detained by the police during a confrontation in Hong Kong Hong Kong police said on Tuesday they arrested 19 people during scuffles with pro-democracy activists prompted by China's decision not to allow the Asian financial hub to choose its next leader. The 19, aged between 20 and 45, were arrested on Monday for illegal assembly, trying to force their way on to a carriageway, charging a police line and for pushing barriers, a police spokeswoman said. Police used pepper spray to disperse activists as Hong Kong center braces for a wave of disruptive protests against China's decision. Hong Kong is in the midst of a political upheaval as activists in the former British colony push for full democracy.


California high school drops mascot criticized by Arab-American group

(Reuters) - A California high school has retired its Middle Eastern-themed mascot and accompanying belly dancers and redrawn its logo after criticism from Arab-Americans that they played on harmful stereotypes, a group advocating for the change said on Monday. Coachella Valley High School agreed to use a new image of a stoic-looking Arab man to represent its sports teams, dubbed "the Arabs," said Abed Ayoub, a spokesman for the American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee, which worked with the school to choose the new logo.

China poultry farm hit in new outbreak of H5N6 bird flu

Nearly 18,000 geese died on a poultry farm in northeast China after being stricken by the H5N6 bird flu virus last month, the agriculture ministry said. As many as 20,550 geese on the farm in Harbin, the capital of Heilongjiang province, showed symptoms of avian flu and 17,790 birds died, the ministry said on its website on Monday. The ministry sealed off and sterilized the infected area, besides culling and safely disposing of almost 69,000 geese, it added. The National Avian Influenza Reference Laboratory confirmed that the geese had the H5N6 virus.

China poultry farm hit in new outbreak of H5N6 bird flu

Nearly 18,000 geese died on a poultry farm in northeast China after being stricken by the H5N6 bird flu virus last month, the agriculture ministry said. As many as 20,550 geese on the farm in Harbin, the capital of Heilongjiang province, showed symptoms of avian flu and 17,790 birds died, the ministry said on its website on Monday. The ministry sealed off and sterilized the infected area, besides culling and safely disposing of almost 69,000 geese, it added. The National Avian Influenza Reference Laboratory confirmed that the geese had the H5N6 virus.

16 Simple Things I Do Daily

In no order, I do the following 16 simple things daily to improve my physical and mental health:1. Walk 10k steps. 2. Drink from a water fountain every time I see one.3. 100 sit ups. 4. Take stairs instead of elevator/escalator/moving walkway. 5. Take nutritional supplements, multivitamins and calcium. 6. Eat at least 60g of protein. ...

Peru police display record 7.7-ton cocaine haul

Police carry blocks of seized cocaine LIMA, Peru (AP) — Peruvian police displayed in a Lima airport police hangar on Monday what officials called the largest cocaine haul ever in the Andean nation, 7.7 metric tons (8.5 tons).


Nurses go on strike in Ebola-hit Liberia

Women stop to clean their hands with sanitiser before entering the John Fitzgerald Kennedy hospital in Monrovia on September 1, 2014 Nurses at Liberia's largest hospital went on strike on Monday, demanding better pay and equipment to protect them against a deadly Ebola epidemic which has killed hundreds in the west African nation. John Tugbeh, spokesman for the strikers at Monrovia's John F Kennedy hospital, said the nurses would not return to work until they are supplied with "personal protective equipment (PPEs)", the hazmat-style suits which guard against infectious diseases. "From the beginning of the Ebola outbreak we have not had any protective equipment to work with. The Ebola virus, transmitted through contact with infected bodily fluids, has killed more than 1,500 people in four countries since the start of the year -- almost 700 of them in Liberia.


The Power of Aromas

Walk through any mall in America and you might suddenly be enticed by the smell of cinnamon buns or coffee. Sell your home and often you are advised by your realtor to bake bread or cookies to encourage prospective buyers. Smells are more influential then you may realize. In these two incidents smells are used to elicit sales. They are there to...

Low-carb diets may beat low-fat options for weight loss, heart health

By Andrew M. Seaman A low-carbohydrate diet is better for losing weight and may also be better for lowering the risk of heart disease than a low-fat diet, according to a new study. While low-carb diets have outperformed other diets when it comes to weight loss, some researchers feared they might be worse for heart health because they tend to be high in fat. The new study shows that with proper nutritional counseling, people can lose more weight and lower their risk factors for heart disease on a low-carbohydrate diet, said the lead author, Dr. Lydia Bazzano of Tulane University in New Orleans. "This study shows if you are overweight and have cardiovascular disease risk factors and haven't had success on other diets, certainly a low-carbohydrate diet is worth a try," said Bazzano.

Cry for help from Americans detained in North Korea

Americans Detained In North Korea Call For US Help Three detained Americans seek diplomatic negotiations for their freedom.


Family dinners may help kids cope with cyberbullying

By Kathryn Doyle NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – Like victims of face-to-face bullying, kids who experience internet bullying are vulnerable to mental health and substance use problems – but spending more time communicating with their parents may help protect them from these harmful consequences, a new study suggests. For example, the researchers found, regular family dinners seemed to help kids cope with online bullying. “In a way, cyberbullying is more insidious because it’s so hard to detect,” said lead author Frank J. Elgar of the Institute for Health and Social Policy at McGill University in Montreal.

High-action TV shows lead to more snacking: study

By Kathryn Doyle NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – Watching high-energy TV programs might make watching calories harder, a new study suggests. With snacks freely available, young adults watching an action movie ate almost twice as much food as those watching an interview show, the researchers found. Those watching the action movie ate more even if the sound was turned off. “What we found was that even watching the silent film generated a large increase in what people ate compared to the talk show,” said coauthor Aner Tal at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York.

Action-packed TV might make you snack more: Study

CHICAGO (AP) — Could action-packed TV fare make you fat? That's the implication of a new study that found people snacked more watching fast-paced television than viewing a more leisurely-paced talk show.

US eating habits improve a bit _ except among poor

FOR RELEASE MONDAY, SEPT. 1, 2014, AT 4 P.M.- FILE - In this April 24, 2014 file photo, a variety of healthy fruits and vegetables are displayed for sale at a market in Washington. A 12-year study released Monday, Sept. 1, 2014, shows a steady improvement in American's eating habits, but food choices remain less than ideal. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File) CHICAGO (AP) — Americans' eating habits have improved — except among the poor, evidence of a widening wealth gap when it comes to diet. Yet even among wealthier adults, food choices remain far from ideal, a 12-year study found.


Parents of ill UK boy fight extradition from Spain

Ashya King parents's lawyer, Juan Isidro Fernandez Diaz, arrives at the National court in Madrid, Spain, Monday, Sept. 1, 2014. A critically-ill 5-year-old boy driven to Spain by his parents, Brett and Naghemeh, against doctors' advice is receiving medical treatment for a brain tumor in a Spanish hospital as his parents await extradition to Britain, police said Sunday. Officers received a phone call late Saturday from a hotel east of Malaga advising that a vehicle fitting the description circulated by police was on its premises. Both parents were arrested and the boy, Ashya King, was taken to a hospital, a Spanish police spokesman said. (AP Photo/Andres Kudacki) LONDON (AP) — The parents of a child suffering from a severe brain tumor signaled Monday they would defy efforts to force them to return to Britain, days after their family fled to seek a novel kind of radiation treatment for the 5-year-old boy.


Cuba's new crackdown takes effect

People put their luggage in a private taxi as they arrive from the U.S. to the Jose Marti International Airport in Havana, Cuba, Monday, Sept. 1, 2014. Cubans braced Monday for a clampdown on the flow of car tires, flat-screen televisions, blue jeans and shampoo in the bags of travelers who haul eye-popping amounts of foreign-bought merchandise to an island where consumer goods are frequently shoddy, scarce and expensive. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa) New government restrictions are upsetting travelers to the island nation.


Novartis Japan admits concealing drug side effects

Swiss pharmaceuticals giant Novartis headquarter building is pictured on January 28, 2009 in Basel The Japanese unit of Swiss pharma giant Novartis has admitted it did not report more than 2,500 cases of serious side effects in patients using its leukaemia and other cancer drugs, reportedly including some fatalities. The revelations, which marked the latest in a string of scandals at the company's Japanese subsidiary, come after local authorities slapped the firm on the wrist, saying it had to clean up its operations. On Friday, Novartis issued a statement saying it had failed to report to regulators at least 2,579 cases where patients had suffered serious potential side effects from its drugs. Japanese media said the number of cases involved could rise as Novartis probes 6,000 other cases.


Microsoft Store Camping World