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China regulator says scandal-hit food supplier forged production dates: Xinhua

Security guards stand inside the Husi Food factory in Shanghai Regulators in Shanghai have found that scandal-hit China-based food supplier forged production dates on some of its products and sold them after their expiry, the official Xinhua news agency reported on Saturday. Shanghai Husi Food, which is owned by Illinois-based OSI Group, is at the center of China's latest food scandal, which has spread to Hong Kong and Japan, over allegations it mixed expired meat with fresh meat. Shanghai Municipal Food and Drug Administration has found that Shanghai Husi forged the production dates on smoked beef patties produced in May 2013 and sold them as being made in January 2014, Xinhua said.


Holy month of Ramadan is a big boon for retailers

In this July 12, 2014 photo, Lebanese shoppers are seen reflected, at left, by a shop window that is decorated with the Islamic crescent symbol representing the season of Ramadan, with the words, "Happy Ramadan," bottom, at the Beirut Mall, in downtown Beirut, Lebanon. Ramadan, Islam’s holiest month, is a boon for retailers in the Middle East, South Asia and beyond. And while some Muslims welcome it as a positive sign, others see it as commercialization of a sacred time of year, threatening to subvert its very nature. (AP Photo/Hussein Malla) DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — Glitzy billboards in the Middle East and postage stamps in the U.S. Advertisements for lingerie and sales on modest skirts. Lavish buffets and cellphone apps.


Hospital shooting suspect had history of violence

A hospital worker views police activity near the scene of a shooting at a wellness center attached to Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital in Darby, Pa., on Thursday, July 24, 2014. A doctor grazed by gunfire from a patient who had entered his office in a suburban hospital's psychiatric unit stopped him by returning fire with his own gun and injuring him, authorities said. (AP Photo) MEDIA, Pa. (AP) — A psychiatric patient who killed his caseworker — and grazed his psychiatrist before the doctor pulled out his own weapon and fired back — has a lengthy history of gun arrests, violence and mental health problems, authorities said.


Hospital gunman planned to kill others, official says

Police at the scene of a shooting at the Mercy-Fitzgerald Hospital in Darby A psychiatrist's patient ranted about a gun ban at a suburban medical complex before opening fire there, killing his caseworker and grazing his psychiatrist before the doctor pulled out his own weapon and fired back, authorities said Friday.


No truce, but 12-hour lull in Gaza fighting begins

Amidst the morning fog, smoke from an Israeli strike rises over Gaza City, Saturday, July 26, 2014. Israel-Hamas fighting looked headed for escalation after U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry failed Friday to broker a weeklong truce as a first step toward a broader deal. Hours after the U.S.-led efforts stalled, the two sides agreed to a 12-hour humanitarian cease-fire to begin Saturday. However, the temporary lull was unlikely to change the trajectory of the current hostilities amid ominous signs that the Gaza war is spilling over into the West Bank. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis) GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip (AP) — A 12-hour humanitarian cease-fire has begun to allow civilians in Gaza to receive aid and evacuate to safer areas.


EU hits Russian intelligence chiefs with sanctions

FILE - In this Wednesday, July 3, 2013, file photo, Russian Federal Security Service Chief Alexander Bortnikov attends a meeting in the Kremlin in Moscow. A European Union document released Friday, July 25, 2014, shows that among those targeted by a EU-wide asset freeze and travel ban are Alexander Bortnikov, head of the Russian Federal Security. The new sanctions were announced in a Friday entry to the EU's Official Journal. In all, 15 people were sanctioned, and 18 organizations or businesses, including rebel groups taking part in the pro-Russia revolt in eastern Ukraine. (AP Photo/RIA-Novosti, Mikhail Klimentyev, Presidential Press Service, File) BRUSSELS (AP) — The European Union on Friday extended its Ukraine-related sanctions to target top Russian intelligence officials and leaders of the pro-Russia revolt in eastern Ukraine, official documents showed.


Arizona's McCain: Execution was torture

FILE - This undated file photo provided by the Arizona Department of Corrections shows inmate Joseph Rudolph Wood. Wood took nearly two hours to die and gasped for about 90 minutes during his execution in Arizona on Wednesday, July 23, 2014. (AP Photo/Arizona Department of Corrections, File) TUCSON, Ariz. (AP) — U.S. Sen. John McCain says the execution of an Arizona inmate that lasted two hours was torture.


Israel rejects Gaza truce plan

Two and a half-year-old Muhammad Al Masri rests on his mother's legs in a classroom at a United Nations school where hundreds of families have sought refuge after fleeing their homes following heavy Israeli forces' strikes, in Jebaliya refugee camp, Gaza Strip, Friday, July 25, 2014. Over 140,000 Palestinians are seeking shelter in 83 UNRWA schools, according to UNRWA spokesman Chris Gunness. The number of Palestinians seeking shelter since the ground operation began has increased seven-fold. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis) Israeli media say the country's Security Cabinet has unanimously rejected a U.S. proposal for a temporary pause in Israel-Hamas fighting.


APNewsBreak: Study recommends inmate immunity test

This undated photo released by the Avenal State Prison public information office shows an aerial view of Avenal State Prison in Avenal, Calif. Federal experts are recommending that California test inmates for immunity to a sometimes fatal soil-borne fungus before incarcerating them at two Central Valley state prisons, Avenal and Pleasant Valley, where the disease has killed nearly three dozen inmates, according to a report obtained Friday, July 25, 2014, by The Associated Press. (AP Photo/Avenal State Prison Public Information Office) SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Federal experts are recommending that California test inmates for immunity to a sometimes fatal soil-borne fungus before incarcerating them at two Central Valley state prisons where the disease has killed nearly three dozen inmates, according to a report obtained Friday by The Associated Press.


What It Feels Like Waiting for Cancer Test Results

What It Feels Like Waiting for Cancer Test Results I was diagnosed with lung cancer in 2006. For the past eight years since my operation I've gone every few months for a blood test or scan. I just had another clear scan, and by now I'm used to the routine, although sometimes if I have a cold or I'm not feeling 100 percent I still feel as I did when I wrote the piece below, when I lived alone...


What It Feels Like Waiting for Cancer Test Results

What It Feels Like Waiting for Cancer Test Results I was diagnosed with lung cancer in 2006. For the past eight years since my operation I've gone every few months for a blood test or scan. I just had another clear scan, and by now I'm used to the routine, although sometimes if I have a cold or I'm not feeling 100 percent I still feel as I did when I wrote the piece below, when I lived alone...


Judge strikes down Florida's gay marriage ban

FILE - In this Feb. 28, 2014, file photo, Kathy Harbin, left, and her spouse Michelle Call hold their children Louis Harbin-Call, 6 months, and Leo Harbin-Call, 2, as they speak during a news conference, at the Utah State Capitol, in Salt Lake City. More than 1,000 same-sex married couples in Utah must wait longer for state benefits after the U.S. Supreme Court granted the state a stay on an order requiring it to recognize the marriages. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File) A Florida judge has overturned the state's ban on same-sex marriage in a ruling that applies to Miami-Dade County, agreeing with a judge in another county who made a similar ruling last week.


Washington wildfire: 300 homes burned

This aerial photo shows structures which were destroyed by wildfires near Pateros, Wash. on Thursday, July 24, 2014. Fire spokesman Pete Buist says the biggest wildfire in the state's history remains at 52 percent contained on Thursday. However, the weather forecast calls for hot and dry conditions to return over the next few days. (AP Photo) A sheriff in Washington state says a massive wildfire has burned 300 homes, double the number previously estimated.


Migrants: Obama urges Latin leaders, GOP to help

Guatemala's President Otto Perez Molina, left, and Honduran President Juan Hernandez, right, listen as U.S. President Barack Obama speaks to the media, after they met to discuss Central American immigration and the border crisis in the Cabinet Room of the White House Friday, July 25, 2014, in Washington. (AP Photo) WASHINGTON (AP) — Pressing for swift action, President Barack Obama on Friday urged Central American presidents and congressional Republicans to help ease the influx of minors and migrant families crossing the southwest border of the U.S.


US: Russia is firing across border into Ukraine

Dutch and Australian investigators examine pieces of the crashed Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 in the village of Rassipne, Donetsk region, eastern Ukraine Friday, July 25, 2014. (AP Photo/Dmitry Lovetsky) KIEV, Ukraine (AP) — Russia is launching artillery attacks from its soil on Ukrainian troops and preparing to move heavier weaponry across the border, the U.S. and Ukraine charged Friday in what appeared to be an ominous escalation of the crisis.


Court voids death sentences for brothers in Wichita Massacre

In this combination of 2013 photos provided by the Kansas Department of Corrections, is Reginald D. Carr, left, and Jonathan D. Carr. The Kansas Supreme Court on Friday, July 25, 2014 overturned the death sentences of the two brothers convicted of capital murder in a crime spree in Wichita in 2000 including robbery, rape, forced sex and four fatal shootings in a snow-covered soccer field. (AP Photo/Kansas Department of Corrections) The Kansas Supreme Court on Friday overturned the death sentences of two brothers convicted of killing four friends who were robbed and forced to engage in sex acts before being shot to death and left in a snow-covered Wichita field.


Ebola outbreak spreads to 4th West African country

ABUJA, Nigeria (AP) — An Ebola outbreak that has left more than 660 people dead across West Africa has spread to the continent's most populous nation after a Liberian man with a high fever vomited aboard an airplane to Nigeria and then died there, officials said Friday.

Tyson Foods to shut three factories, cut 950 jobs

Tyson food meat products are shown in this photo illustration in Encinitas Tyson Foods Inc said it will discontinue operations at three of its factories which make processed meat products such as sausages and hot dogs, affecting about 950 people. The largest U.S. meat processor, which won the bidding war for Hillshire Brands Co in June, said the closures were not related to the acquisition. "The decision to close these plants was underway long before the (Hillshire) discussions began", Tyson spokesman Gary Mickelson told Reuters. Tyson outbid Pilgrim's Pride Corp with its $63 per share offer for Hillshire, valuing the Jimmy Dean sausages maker at $8.55 billion.


Meat processor Tyson Foods to close 3 plants, cut 950 jobs

Tyson food meat products are shown in this photo illustration in Encinitas Tyson Foods Inc said it will discontinue operations at three of its factories which make processed meat products such as sausages and hot dogs, affecting about 950 people. The largest U.S. meat processor, which won the bidding war for Hillshire Brands Co in June, said the closures were not related to the acquisition. "The decision to close these plants was underway long before the (Hillshire) discussions began", Tyson spokesman Gary Mickelson told Reuters. Tyson outbid Pilgrim's Pride Corp with its $63 per share offer for Hillshire, valuing the Jimmy Dean sausages maker at $8.55 billion.


U.S. appeals court backs Florida law in 'Docs v. Glocks' case

(Reuters) - A U.S. appeals court ruled on Friday in favor of a Florida law that bars doctors from asking patients about gun ownership, overturning a decision in the so-called "Docs v. Glocks" case by a lower court that had struck it down. Florida's Republican-led legislature passed the law after a north Florida couple complained that a doctor asked them if they had guns, and refused to see them after they declined to answer. A panel of the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, in a 2-1 vote, vacated the federal judge's ruling and described the law as a "legitimate regulation" of professional conduct that simply codified good medical care. Any restrictions it places on physicians' speech was entirely incidental, the appeals court said, since it "was intended to protect patient privacy and curtail abuses of the physician-patient relationship." Lawyers representing doctors and others had argued that the law violated healthcare providers' First Amendment rights by threatening them with heavy fines and the possibility of losing their license should they broach the subject.

Obama tells Central American leaders most children will go home

U.S. President Obama disembarks from Air Force One as he arrives at Los Angeles International Airport By Steve Holland and Jeff Mason WASHINGTON (Reuters) - President Barack Obama urged the leaders of three Central American countries on Friday to work with him to stem the flow of child migrants who have surged across the U.S. border and warned that most of them would not be allowed to stay. In a White House meeting with the leaders of Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador, Obama had a tough-love message: his administration had compassion for the children, but not many would qualify for humanitarian relief or refugee status. The meeting came as Obama struggles to contain a border crisis triggered by the tens of thousands of children who have crossed the Texas border with Mexico in recent months.


Cellphone unlocking set to become legal again

Amazon Fire Heats Up the Smartphone Wars Congress passed a bill Friday that makes it legal to "unlock" cellphones so the devices can —at least in some instances— be used on other carriers.


Sen. Walsh responds to plagiarism scandal

Exclusive: Sen. John Walsh responds to revelations that he plagiarized Army War College paper Montana Democrat speaks with Yahoo News following plagiarism revelations.


Nigeria confirms Liberian man died of Ebola in Lagos

Members of Doctors Without Borders (MSF) wear protective gear at the isolation ward of the Donka Hospital in Conakry on July 23, 2014 Nigeria said Friday that Ebola caused the death of a Liberian national who died in quarantine in Lagos, confirmation that the worst-ever outbreak of the virus has reached Africa's most populous country. Nigeria's Health Minister Onyebuchi Chukwu told journalists that "thorough medical tests" had confirmed "the virus of Ebola" as the cause of death. The 40-year-old, who died overnight, worked for the Liberian government and had travelled to Nigeria from Monrovia by air via Togo's capital Lome. His final destination was the southern city of Calabar where he was scheduled to attend a meeting organised by the west African bloc known as ECOWAS (Economic Community of West African States), the minister said.


Three children dead after Philly carjacking

A police officer walks past the wreckage of a carjacked vehicle that police say hit a group of people on a corner in Philadelphia on Friday, July 25, 2014, killing two children and critically injuring three other people. One of the children was pronounced dead at the scene and another at a hospital, Homicide Capt. James Clark said. (AP Photo/Philadelphia Daily News, Alejandro A. Alvarez) MANDATORY CREDIT; THE EVENING BULLETIN OUT, TV OUT; MAGS OUT; NO SALES Three other people were critically injured after a hijacked car was driven into a crowd.


What We Don’t Know About Lethal Injection Drugs

Drug doses and suppliers are sometimes kept secret, experts say.

Large Sandy-struck family splits $20M lottery win

In this Thursday, July 24, 2014 photo, Forked River 7-Eleven owner Manny Chaudhari, right, poses for a photo with winning lottery ticket buyer Sigrid Endreson during a news conference, in Beachwood. Endreson's large New Jersey shore family that suffered losses during Superstorm Sandy will share a $20 million lottery jackpot that Endreson, one of 17 siblings, said would be "a great pick-me-up." (AP Photo/The Asbury Park Press, Doug Hood) NO SALES A lottery-playing tradition started by the matriarch of a large New Jersey shore family paid off for her 17 children this week when the group won a $20 million jackpot that will partly be used to help family members recover from 2012's Superstorm Sandy.


AP ANALYSIS: Old story, new twists in Gaza war

FILE - In this Tuesday, July 22, 2014, file photo, Israeli police officers secure a destroyed house that was hit by a rocket fired by Palestinians militants from Gaza, in Yahud, a Tel Aviv suburb near the airport, central Israel. The third Gaza war is playing out very much like the first one some five years ago: We are now at the stage where the harrowing civilian toll in Gaza is at the center of the discourse, eclipsing the rocket attacks by Hamas militants which are the reason for the Israeli assault. In 2009, Hamas was firing relatively small projectiles with minimal range, mostly aimed at border communities surrounding the blockaded Gaza Strip. Now Hamas is firing at Tel Aviv, which is 80 kilometers (50 miles) north of the strip, and even at some cities beyond. (AP Photo/Dan Balilty, File) CAIRO (AP) — The third Gaza war is playing out much like the first one more than five years ago: The harrowing civilian toll in Gaza is now at the center of the discourse, eclipsing the rocket attacks by Hamas militants that were the stated reason for the Israeli assault.


FIBA to review 'discriminatory' headgear ban

Let Sikhs play – How turban bans in sport are threatening the last surviving bastion of equal rights Facing claims that Muslim and Sikh players are being discriminated against, basketball's governing body will review its ban which prevents players wearing headgear for religious reasons.


Texas city reopens park where man suffered over 1,000 bee stings

By Amanda Orr HOUSTON (Reuters) - A North Texas city reopened a public park on Friday, a day after three of its maintenance crew employees were attacked by a swarm of bees with one being stung more than 1,000 times. "Crews performed an extensive search to make sure the bees hadn't come back, and once that was done, they took down the barricades in the area," said Barry Levy, a spokesman for the city of Wichita Falls, about 100 miles (160 km) northwest of Dallas.
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