This Website Maybe For Sale – Click Here -

HEALTH Resource Center

Source Match Health News

AP PHOTOS: City streets destroyed in Taiwan blasts

A destroyed fire truck is seen overturned in the rubble after massive gas explosions in Kaohsiung, Taiwan, Friday, Aug. 1, 2014. A series of underground explosions about midnight Thursday and early Friday ripped through Taiwan's second-largest city, killing scores of people, Taiwan's National Fire Agency said Friday. (AP Photo/Wally Santana) City streets destroyed, transformed into trenches strewn with dirt, ripped pieces of pipe and jagged blocks of concrete. Broken fire trucks turned upside down, twisted soot-covered cars and motorcycles, ripped advertising signs.


209K jobs added in US, but unemployment rate rises to 6.2 percent

In this June 23, 2014 photo, job seekers wait in line to meet with recruiters during a job fair in Philadelphia. The government issues the July jobs report on Friday, Aug. 1, 2014. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke) WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. employers extended their solid hiring into July by adding 209,000 jobs. It was the sixth straight month of job growth above 200,000, evidence that businesses are gradually shedding the caution that had marked the 5-year-old recovery.


Man maddened by neighbor's fire pit draws sword to settle dispute

Lord Of The Rings Film Props Up For Auction BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — A man who apparently was upset about his neighbor's fire pit has been arrested on suspicion of stabbing the neighbor in the arm with a novelty sword.


The cease-fire that wasn't

Palestinian children walk hand in hand as residents return to the heavily bombed Gaza City neighborhood of Shijaiyah, close to the Israeli border, Friday, Aug. 1, 2014. A three-day Gaza cease-fire that began Friday quickly unraveled, with Israel and Hamas accusing each other of violating the truce as several Palestinians were killed in a heavy exchange of fire in the southern town of Rafah. (AP Photo/Dusan Vranic) At least 50 Palestinians dead, Israeli soldier said captured, fighting in Rafah.


Cantor to resign from House seat in August

FILE - House Majority Leader Rep. Eric Cantor, R-Va., pauses during a news conference on the payroll tax cut on Capitol Hill on in this Dec. 22, 2011 file photo taken in Washington. The Richmond Times-Dispatch reported early Friday Aug. 1, 2014 that Cantor says he will step down Aug. 18 to make sure constituents have a voice during the "consequential" lame-duck session. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File) RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — After a surprise primary election loss, U.S. Rep. Eric Cantor will resign his seat in the House of Representatives months earlier than expected.


Myanmar military releases 91 child soldiers

Myanmar's military released 91 children and young people from military service on Friday, the United Nations said as it encouraged the army to speed up demobilization to ensure it has no under-age soldiers in its ranks. Myanmar has for years been listed among countries where children have been recruited to fight, by both the government army and ethnic minority guerrilla groups battling the government for autonomy. "Such discharges must be accelerated so that the Tatmadaw can quickly achieve the double objective of zero under-age recruitment, and full discharge of those that are under 18," said Shalini Bahuguna of the UN Children's Fund, referring to the military by its traditional name in Burmese. Myanmar's military ran the country for 49 years and was condemned internationally for human rights abuses including the use of child soldiers.

12,000 evacuees return after Taiwan gas explosions

Soldiers use electronic sensors to search for missing persons believed to be buried after massive gas explosions in Kaohsiung, Taiwan, Friday, Aug. 1, 2014. A series of explosions about midnight Thursday and early Friday ripped through Taiwan's second-largest city, killing scores of people, Taiwan's National Fire Agency said Friday. (AP Photo/Wally Santana) KAOHSIUNG, Taiwan (AP) — The 12,000 people who fled in fear of more gas pipeline explosions in Taiwan's second-largest city returned to their homes Friday after authorities said there was no more risk of blasts like the series that devastated a more than 2 square kilometers (1 square mile) area, killing 26 people and injuring 267.


W. African leaders, WHO meet to address Ebola

China's Margaret Chan, center, Director-General of the World Health Organization, WHO, is greeted by officials as she arrives at the airport for talks on Ebola in the city of Conakry, Guinea, Friday, Aug. 1, 2014. The death toll from the worst recorded Ebola outbreak in history surpassed 700 in West Africa as security forces went house-to-house in Sierra Leone’s capital Thursday looking for patients and others exposed to the disease. Fears grew as the United States warned against travel to the three infected countries — Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia — and Sierra Leone’s soccer team was blocked from boarding a plane in Nairobi, Kenya, that was to take them to the Seychelles for a game on Saturday. (AP Photo/ Youssouf Bah) CONAKRY, Guinea (AP) — Presidents from the West African countries hit by the Ebola outbreak are meeting with world health leaders to come up with ways to stop the spread of the deadly disease.


35 Palestinians killed, Israeli officer missing

A Palestinian inspects a destroyed house in the heavily bombed Gaza City neighborhood of Shijaiyah, close to the Israeli border, Friday, Aug. 1, 2014. A three-day Gaza cease-fire that began Friday quickly unraveled, with Israel and Hamas accusing each other of violating the truce as several Palestinians were killed in a heavy exchange of fire in the southern town of Rafah. (AP Photo/Dusan Vranic) GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip (AP) — A Gaza cease-fire quickly unraveled Friday as violence erupted in and around the southern town of Rafah, with at least 35 Palestinians killed by Israeli shelling and the military saying an infantry officer may have been captured.


Mich. 2-pound newborn 'Mighty Girl' gets rare heart procedure

A premature newborn lies on a cot in Saint Denis near Paris on March 19, 2013 GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. (AP) — A 2-pound Michigan newborn dubbed "Mighty Girl" by her parents is one of the smallest babies in the world to undergo a heart procedure to open up a blocked artery caused by a congenital defect.


Ukraine: Search base set up at jet crash site

An Ukrainian government army military vehicle travels across a damaged bridge near the village of Debaltseve, Donetsk region, eastern Ukraine, Thursday, July 31, 2014. (AP Photo/Dmitry Lovetsky) HRABOVE, Ukraine (AP) — With the sound of artillery fire in the distance, dozens of international investigators arrived Friday at the zone where a Malaysia Airlines plane crashed in eastern Ukraine and began preparations to comb the rural area for remains of as many as 80 victims and jet debris.


State on Friday considers new look for edible pot

FILE - In this June 19, 2014, file photo, chef Alex Tretter carries a tray of cannabis-infused peanut butter and jelly cups to the oven for baking at Sweet Grass Kitchen, a well-established Denver-based gourmet marijuana edibles bakery which sells its confections to retail outlets throughout the state. Colorado marijuana regulators have drafted an emergency rule aimed at making it easier for new marijuana users to tell how much pot they are eating. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley, File) DENVER (AP) — Edible marijuana comes with all kinds of warning labels in Colorado. But once those pot brownies and gummy bears are out of the package, they can look identical to straight-laced treats.


Colorado wants you to know when there's pot in your brownie

FILE - In this June 19, 2014, file photo, chef Alex Tretter carries a tray of cannabis-infused peanut butter and jelly cups to the oven for baking at Sweet Grass Kitchen, a well-established Denver-based gourmet marijuana edibles bakery which sells its confections to retail outlets throughout the state. Colorado marijuana regulators have drafted an emergency rule aimed at making it easier for new marijuana users to tell how much pot they are eating. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley, File) DENVER (AP) — Edible marijuana comes with all kinds of warning labels in Colorado. But once those pot brownies and gummy bears are out of the package, they can look identical to straight-laced treats.


Poland marks 70th anniversary of Warsaw Uprising

People light candles at the Warsaw Uprising monument in Warsaw, Friday, Aug. 1, 2014. On the 70th anniversary of the Warsaw Uprising, Poland is honoring the fighters and victims of the rebellion against Nazi Germans by laying wreaths, sounding sirens and singing insurgent tunes. On Aug. 1, 1944, thousands of poorly-armed city residents rose up against the German forces to try to take control of the city ahead of the advancing Soviet army. They held on for 63 days before being forced to surrender. Almost 200,000 people were killed. The Nazis expelled the survivors and set the city ablaze. (AP Photo/ Czarek Sokolowski) WARSAW, Poland (AP) — Poland on Friday honored the fighters and victims of a 1944 rebellion against Nazi Germans by laying wreaths, lighting candles and singing insurgent tunes to mark the 70th anniversary of the Warsaw Uprising.


Guinea expert: Liberia, Sierra Leone moves may worsen Ebola spread

Medical staff put on protective gear in Kenema government hospital before taking a sample from a suspected Ebola patient in Kenema By Saliou Samb CONAKRY (Reuters) - The leader of Guinea's Ebola task force said on Friday that moves by neighbouring Liberia and Sierra Leone to contain the disease that has killed 729 people this year - its deadliest outbreak - may have the opposite effect. Liberia has put in place measures including closing all schools and some government departments as well as possibly quarantining affected communities. Sierra Leone declared a state of emergency and called in troops to isolate Ebola victims. "Currently, some measures taken by our neighbours could make the fight against Ebola even harder," Aboubacar Sidiki Diakité told Reuters before a meeting of heads of state from the three West African nations to coordinate a regional response.


African leaders to launch $100m Ebola battle plan

A nurse puts up a poster about Ebola on a wall of a public health centre on July 31, 2014 in Monrovia, Liberia The head of the World Health Organization and presidents of the west African countries suffering the world's worst-ever Ebola outbreak met in Guinea on Friday to launch a $100 million emergency response. The leaders of Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia gathered in Conakry to organise the deployment of hundreds of medical personnel to help overstretched workers and facilities struggling with an epidemic which has now claimed more than 700 lives. The plan will also bolster efforts to prevent and detect suspected cases, urge better border surveillance, and reinforce WHO's sub-regional outbreak coordination centre in Guinea. The meeting came after Dubai's Emirates became the first global airline to announce it was suspending flights to the stricken area while the United States, Germany and France issued warnings against travel to the three African countries.


Biota's flu drug fails mid-stage study

(Reuters) - Biota Pharmaceuticals Inc said its experimental influenza drug failed to meet the main goal in a mid-stage study. Patients given a 40 milligram (mg) or 80 mg dose did not achieve a statistically significant reduction, compared with the placebo, in the median time to alleviate influenza symptoms - the main goal of the trial, Biota said. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services in April pulled out of a contract to support the drug's development with $231 million, after which the company said it would stop work on the drug. Biota said in June it would cut its workforce by about two-thirds and shut a facility in Melbourne, Australia following the loss of the contract.

Biota's flu drug fails mid-stage study

(Reuters) - Biota Pharmaceuticals Inc said its experimental influenza drug failed to meet the main goal in a mid-stage study. Patients given a 40 milligram (mg) or 80 mg dose did not achieve a statistically significant reduction, compared with the placebo, in the median time to alleviate influenza symptoms - the main goal of the trial, Biota said. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services in April pulled out of a contract to support the drug's development with $231 million, after which the company said it would stop work on the drug. Biota said in June it would cut its workforce by about two-thirds and shut a facility in Melbourne, Australia following the loss of the contract.

Alzheimer's documentary 'Alive Inside' pushes for music therapy

Director Rossato-Bennett poses for a portrait while promoting the documentary "Alive Inside" in Los Angeles By Eric Kelsey LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - Michael Rossato-Bennett initially thought it was the worst job he had ever taken. When Rossato-Bennett started filming three years ago he met Henry.


Alzheimer's documentary 'Alive Inside' pushes for music therapy

Director Rossato-Bennett poses for a portrait while promoting the documentary "Alive Inside" in Los Angeles By Eric Kelsey LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - Michael Rossato-Bennett initially thought it was the worst job he had ever taken. When Rossato-Bennett started filming three years ago he met Henry.


U.S. top lawyer calls for greater transparency over execution drugs

U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder speaks at the U.S. ambassador's residence in Oslo By Eric M. Johnson (Reuters) - Attorney General Eric Holder is calling on states to be more transparent about the drug cocktails used in executions in the wake of a series of botched lethal injections that have renewed a national debate over the death penalty. States that impose capital punishment have turned to new suppliers of chemical combinations for lethal injections after European drug makers objected to having their products used for that purpose. ...


Competency hearing expected for Wisconsin girl in Slenderman case

Two doctors are expected to testify on Friday on the competency of one of two Wisconsin girls accused of luring their friend into the woods and repeatedly stabbing her to please Slenderman, a fictional Internet character. Morgan Geyser and Anissa Weier, both 12, have been charged as adults with first-degree attempted homicide. They are accused of stabbing their classmate 19 times in late May in Waukesha, a western suburb of Milwaukee, the morning after a sleepover. The girls told investigators they stabbed their friend, also 12, to impress Slenderman, a tall, fictional bogeyman popular on the Internet that they insisted was real, according to a criminal complaint.

Full Episode: NY Med 7/31

Alejandro Berenstein is a world leader in his field, looking to help save the two year old daughter of a coast guard officer after a catastrophic cerebral event.

The Pill linked to breast cancer risk for younger women

An illustration picture shows a woman holding a pill at her home in Nice By Kathryn Doyle NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - A new statistical analysis finds that women under age 50 who were diagnosed with breast cancer were also more likely to have recently been on some versions of the Pill. The increased cancer risk still translates to less than a one percent chance of developing breast cancer for most younger women, researchers emphasize, so the results should not outweigh the many benefits of taking oral contraceptives. These results are not enough to change clinical practice or to discourage any women from taking birth control pills, said lead study author Elizabeth F. Beaber, of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Washington. Some past research suggests that the hormones in birth control pills could “feed” hormone-sensitive tumors and thereby raise younger women’s risk of a breast cancer diagnosis, or of developing more aggressive cancers (see Reuters Health article of February 26, 2013 here: http://reut.rs/1s8tM44).


The Pill linked to breast cancer risk for younger women

An illustration picture shows a woman holding a pill at her home in Nice By Kathryn Doyle NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - A new statistical analysis finds that women under age 50 who were diagnosed with breast cancer were also more likely to have recently been on some versions of the Pill. The increased cancer risk still translates to less than a one percent chance of developing breast cancer for most younger women, researchers emphasize, so the results should not outweigh the many benefits of taking oral contraceptives. These results are not enough to change clinical practice or to discourage any women from taking birth control pills, said lead study author Elizabeth F. Beaber, of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Washington. Some past research suggests that the hormones in birth control pills could “feed” hormone-sensitive tumors and thereby raise younger women’s risk of a breast cancer diagnosis, or of developing more aggressive cancers (see Reuters Health article of February 26, 2013 here: http://reut.rs/1s8tM44).


Pakistan widows, 'second' wives flee fighting but are denied aid

Internally displaced woman walks outside a food distribution centre set up in a sports stadium in Bannu By Katharine Houreld and Saud Mehsud BANNU Pakistan (Reuters) - Thousands of women displaced by fighting in Pakistan are struggling to get food and other aid because they lack identity cards and conservative Muslim elders have forbidden them from going to distribution centers. The women are among nearly a million people who registered for aid after the army began an offensive against the Pakistani Taliban in North Waziristan, a mountainous region on the Afghan border. Many ended up in Bannu, a small city on the main road out of the semi-autonomous tribal region. No census has been conducted in North Waziristan for years, so no one knows the true scale of the problem.


Sierra Leone declares emergency as Ebola death toll hits 729

Medical staff working with Medecins sans Frontieres prepare to bring food to patients kept in an isolation area at the MSF Ebola treatment centre in Kailahun By Umaru Fofana FREETOWN (Reuters) - Sierra Leone has declared a state of emergency and called in troops to quarantine Ebola victims, joining neighbouring Liberia in imposing controls as the death toll from the outbreak of the virus hit 729 in West Africa. The World Health Organisation said it would launch a $100 million response plan on Friday during a meeting with the affected nations in Guinea. The WHO on Thursday reported 57 new deaths in the four days to July 27 in Guinea, Liberia, Sierra Leone and Nigeria, raising the death toll to 729. It said the number of Ebola cases had topped 1,300.


10 Things to Know for Today

FILE - In a Monday, Jan. 17, 2011 file photo, gun violence protesters participate in a lie-in during an anti-gun rally at the Capitol in Richmond, Va. Nearly six in 10 Americans want stricter gun laws in the aftermath of last month's deadly school shooting in Connecticut, with majorities favoring a nationwide ban on military-style, rapid-fire weapons and limits on gun violence depicted in video games and movies and on TV, according to a new Associated Press-GfK poll. A lopsided 84 percent of adults would like to see the establishment of a federal standard for background checks for people buying guns at gun shows, the poll showed. President Barack Obama was set Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2013 to unveil a wide-ranging package of steps for reducing gun violence expected to include a proposed ban on assault weapons, limits on the capacity of ammunition magazines and universal background checks for gun sales. (AP Photo/Steve Helber, File) Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about today:


Smith & Nephew offers low-cost hip, knee service in U.S

By Ben Hirschler LONDON (Reuters) - Smith & Nephew, Europe's largest maker of artificial joints, is to offer U.S. customers a new "no frills" service that will slash the cost of buying its replacement hips and knees. Chief Executive Olivier Bohuon said the so-called Syncera service, designed to strengthen S&N's position in a highly competitive market, would appeal to between 5 and 10 percent of U.S. hospitals that cannot afford its full-service offering. The British company unveiled Syncera alongside second-quarter results, which showed a 10 percent rise in trading profit as the group regained momentum after a weak start to the year, despite problems in its wound management division.

Europe started WWI a century ago, blind to tragedy

In this photo taken on Saturday, July 26, 2014, the graves of World War I soldiers, Private George Ellison, background right, and Private John Parr, foreground, face each other at the Saint Symphorien Cemetery near Mons, Belgium. Parr and Ellison were the first and the last, respectively, Commonwealth soldiers to die in battle during World War I. Purely by coincidence the graves are separated only by a few feet. (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo) SAINT-SYMPHORIEN, Belgium (AP) — British Pvt. John Parr set off on his reconnaissance bike on the lookout for German troops amid the rolling farmland and woods south of Brussels in August 1914. It was the last anyone saw of 'Ole Man' Parr, the ironic nickname he won due to his tender age of 17. He became known as the first Commonwealth soldier to die on the Western Front of World War I, likely killed by German gunfire.


macys.com Camping World